Can I Avoid Pre-Award Surveys?

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If you’ve recently taken on a government contract, you might be wondering – is it possible to avoid pre-award surveys? This question is worth considering, as pre-award surveys can be an additional hassle that your business probably doesn’t need. Luckily, our team here at Diener and Associates is on hand to help with this question. As your local providers of professional DCAA accounting support, we are here to help with all DCAA and pre-award questions you might have!

 

Who Are the DCAA?

First of all, we need to consider who the DCAA is. The DCAA, or the Defense Contract Audit Agency, ensures that all businesses awarded contracts for Department of Defense projects can adhere to the financial requirements.

To this end, the DCAA carries out pre-award surveys on some companies to ensure that their financial management is good enough to justify awarding the project to that firm. In addition, it considers your business’s savings to ensure that you’ll be able to afford the cost of carrying out the work, as well as your existing accounting systems and their suitability.

Fortunately for your firm, we here at Diener and Associates can help with this. So, if you need support with optimizing your business’s financial management, get in touch with our team today to see how our DCAA accounting support could prove useful for your firm.

 

Can I Avoid Pre-Award Surveys?

While completing the pre-award survey isn’t a significant challenge, it’s certainly an additional hassle and source of stress for your business. However, you might not need to undergo a pre-award survey at all.

Indeed, as explained by FCW, “Prior to awarding any government contract, the contracting officer must determine that the prospective awardee is a responsible firm. A responsible company must convince the government that it has the financial capacity, organization, experience, integrity, business ethics, and other attributes expected of a government contractor. If the information on hand is adequate for this determination, there is no need for a pre-award survey. However, when the readily available information is insufficient for a determination, the contracting officer may request a pre-award survey.”

In this case, providing all of the necessary financial information up-front for your government contract application could be a viable way for your business to avoid the stress of undergoing a pre-award survey. As such, this could prove helpful for your firm to consider – and our team here at Diener and Associates can help make these decisions if needed.

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